Scroll down for details of WAS talks in February and March 2020

Winchelsea Archaeological Society hold their first talk of 2020 on Tuesday 25th February at 2.30pm in the Court Hall.

Passing of the Tide: a history of Bishopstone Tidemills and an introduction to its archaeology. An illustrated talk by Luke Barber, Research Officer of the Sussex Archaeological Society.

Bishopstone Tidemills

Situated between Newhaven and Seaford the site at Bishopstone Tidemills is an extremely unusual one, particularly for the south-east. The mill was established in the later 18th century on a tidal creek, formerly the course of the river Ouse. During the early 19th century the then miller established a village at the site to house his workers and expanded the mill to become the largest in Sussex. The village continued to thrive even after the mill finally closed in 1883. Later arrivals included a Royal Naval Air Service seaplane base during the Great War, a beach hospital for sick children and a stable for lame race horses in the 1920s. All came to an abrupt end when the village was cleared at the start of WW2. After the war nobody came back. Recently a community archaeology project has been looking at its history and standing/buried remains to understand more.

Talks are free to Society members and non-members are welcome at an admission charge of £3. Ample roadside parking is available within the town.

For enquiries please e-mail mervynhack@sky.com or telephone 01797 225021

Winchelsea Archaeological Society hold their second talk of 2020 on Wednesday 25th March at 2.30pm in the Court Hall.

How to Build a Georgian House
Stephen Gray MSc Dip Arch ACIfA IHBC

Bishopstone Tidemills

From the aftermath of the Great Fire of London and into the Victorian era, one house type was ubiquitous from London to Bath, Liverpool to Dublin and Boston to St Leonard’s-on-Sea. Danish architect Steen Eiler Rasmussen described the Georgian terrace house as “…a refined industrial product brought to perfection through constant selection during repeated serial construction.”

Stephen Gray will explore how the elegant proportions of the Georgian town house were intertwined with legislation to prevent fire, the standardisation of brick sizes, property development under the leasehold system, mass production of sash windows and other joinery items, and the standardisation of timber sizes exported from Russia.

Talks are free to Society members and non-members are welcome at an admission charge of £3. Ample roadside parking is available within the town.

For enquiries please e-mail mervynhack@sky.com or telephone 01797 225021